Vegetables

From Ohio History Central
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From the first days of settlement, almost every farm family had a vegetable garden for personal use. Eventually in some parts of Ohio, vegetables became crops that made money. In 1992, 2,349 farms in Ohio harvested vegetables from more than 55,000 acres. The leading seven counties were:

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County Acres
Fulton2,220 acres
Henry2,474 acres
Huron6,902 acres
Lucas2,125 acres
Putnam3,350,000 acres
Sandusky4,896,000 acres
Wood2,916,000 acres

Processing Tomatoes

Early Ohioans did not know or grow tomatoes. Many people thought that they were poisonous because they are in the same family of plants as the poisonous Deadly Nightshade. By the 1840s, however, both farmers and townspeople generally used tomatoes as food. In 1992, 980 farms in Ohio grew tomatoes on 16,196 acres. In terms of harvest, both acres and tons of tomatoes, the top ranking counties were:

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County Acres Tons
Fulton75020,850
Ottawa124033,430
Putnam191048,540
Sandusky182047,850
Wood122032,060

And in 1995, Ohio ranked second in the nation in production of processing tomatoes.

Sweet Corn

In 1992, 1567 Ohio farms grew Sweet Corn on 15,561 acres. The leading counties were:

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County Acres
Champaign958
Huron740
Lucas1,359
Portage869
Stark569
Summit650

In 1995, Ohio ranked fifth in the nation in production of Sweet Corn.

Dry Edible Beans (Except for Dry Limas)

In 1992, 85 Ohio farms produced 47,796,000 pounds of Dry Edible Beans on 2,821 acres of land. The four top counties were:

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County Acres CWT
Hancock4527,292
Henry2285,832
Mercer2144,708
Paulding3207,872