Sisters of the Incarnate Word

From Ohio History Central

The Sisters of the Incarnate Word is an order of Roman Catholic women dedicated to assisting and educating other people. Founded in France in 1625, the Sisters of the Incarnate Word fled this country during the French Revolution. Most of these nuns established new missions in Mexico, but religious persecution there caused most of the order to flee to the United States.

Upon arriving in the United States, most Sisters of the Incarnate Word settled in Texas, where they continued their educational work. A small number of these nuns came to Cleveland, Ohio in 1927 at the invitation of Archbishop Joseph Schrembs. On March 4, 1930, the Ohio members of the Sisters of the Incarnate Word established their permanent headquarters in Parma Heights, Ohio. Originally having only seven members, the chapter grew to thirty-five by 1935 and fifty-seven by 1940.

The Sisters of the Incarnate Word established three schools in Ohio. The schools included the Immaculate Conception School in Wellsville, St. Anthony-St. Bridget School in Cleveland, and a day school for both boys and girls at the convent in Parma Heights. Unfortunately for the Sisters of the Incarnate Word, in January 1935, their convent in Parma Heights burned. After relocating for several years to another convent, the Sisters of the Incarnate Word eventually returned to Parma Heights.

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