International Order of Twelve Knights and Daughters of Tabor

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The International Order of Twelve Knights and Daughters of Tabor is a fraternal society for African Americans.

Moses Dickson, a former slave, established the International Order of Twelve Knights and Daughters of Tabor in Independence, Missouri in 1872. This group sought to promote "Christianity, education, morality and temperance and the art of governing, self reliance and true manhood and womanhood." While the organization eventually had chapters across the United States of America, it especially flourished in the South. This group is especially known for its activities in Mississippi, where it established the Taborian Hospital in Mound Bayou. The hospital opened in 1942, and its entire staff consisted of African Americans. African Americans received free medical care at the hospital as long as they paid a yearly fee to maintain the facility. Initially, the fee was approximately eight dollars. Twenty years later, the fee was just thirty dollars per year. Between 1942 and 1964, approximately 135,000 people received treatment at the facility. In 1967, the International Order of Twelve Knights and Daughters of Tabor ceased operation of the facility. While not as prominent as it once was, the International Order of Twelve Knights and Daughters of Tabor continues to exist today.

The International Order of Twelve Knights and Daughters of Tabor eventually had a presence in Ohio. In 1888, some African Americans in Ironton, Ohio formed a chapter, the second such group in Ohio. They called their group "Pride of Ohio Tabernacle, No. 384."

See Also

References

  1. Beito, David T. From Mutual Aid to the Welfare State: Fraternal Societies and Social Services, 1890-1967. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1999.  
  2. "Order of Twelve." Ironton Register. 9 February 1888.