Difference between revisions of "Ater Mound"

From Ohio History Central
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<p>The Ater Mound was a large, conical burial mound located in Concord Township, Ross County, Ohio. It was built by the people known to archaeologists as the Hopewell Culture (circa 100 BC-AD 500). It is estimated to have been 120 feet long by 77 feet wide and 6 feet high.</p>
 
<p>The Ater Mound was a large, conical burial mound located in Concord Township, Ross County, Ohio. It was built by the people known to archaeologists as the Hopewell Culture (circa 100 BC-AD 500). It is estimated to have been 120 feet long by 77 feet wide and 6 feet high.</p>
<p>It was inadvertently damaged by a construction project and the remnant was excavated by the Ohio Historical Society in 1948. Raymond Baby, then the Curator of Archaeology, directed the excavations recovering many remarkable artifacts, including more than 1,500 beads that once had decorated a blanket used to cover the burial of a child.</p>
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<p>It was inadvertently damaged by a construction project and the remnant was excavated by the Ohio History Connection in 1948. Raymond Baby, then the Curator of Archaeology, directed the excavations recovering many remarkable artifacts, including more than 1,500 beads that once had decorated a blanket used to cover the burial of a child.</p>
 
==See Also==
 
==See Also==
 
*[[http://66.195.173.140/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=612 Ater Mound]]
 
*[[http://66.195.173.140/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=612 Ater Mound]]

Revision as of 10:19, 24 March 2015

Shell found in Ater Mound.jpg
Interior spiral shell sections have been cut away from a very large conch shell to make a hollow container. There are three small perforations drilled in the body of the shell and one small hole at the larger end of the item. There are some encrustations adhering to both interior and exterior surfaces. The shell is white, very pale brown and light brownish gray in color. It may have been used as a dipper. Item was excavated from the Raymond J. Ater Mound in Concord Township, Ross County, Ohio.

The Ater Mound was a large, conical burial mound located in Concord Township, Ross County, Ohio. It was built by the people known to archaeologists as the Hopewell Culture (circa 100 BC-AD 500). It is estimated to have been 120 feet long by 77 feet wide and 6 feet high.

It was inadvertently damaged by a construction project and the remnant was excavated by the Ohio History Connection in 1948. Raymond Baby, then the Curator of Archaeology, directed the excavations recovering many remarkable artifacts, including more than 1,500 beads that once had decorated a blanket used to cover the burial of a child.

See Also


References

  1. Byers, A. Martin. The Ohio Hopewell Episode: Paradigm Lost and Paradigm Gained. Akron, OH: University of Akron Press, 2004.
  2. Carr, Christopher, and D. Troy Case, eds. Gathering Hopewell: Society, Ritual, and Ritual Interaction. New York, NY: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, 2005.
  3. CERHAS. EarthWorks, Virtual Explorations of the Ancient Ohio Valley. The Center for the Electronic Reconstruction of Historical and Archaeological Sites (CERHAS). Cincinnati, OH, 2006.
  4. Case, D. Troy and Christopher Carr, eds. The Scioto Hopewell and their Neighbors: Bioarchaeological Documentation and Cultural Understanding. New York, NY: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, 2008.
  5. Warriner, Gray, producer. Legacy of the Mound Builders. Seattle, WA: Camera One for the National Park Service and the Hopewell Culture National Historical Park, 1994.
  6. Woodward, Susan L., and Jerry N. McDonald. Indian Mounds of the Middle Ohio Valley: A Guide to Mounds and Earthworks of the Adena, Hopewell, Cole, and Fort Ancient People. Lincoln: The University of Nebraska Press, 2002.